Lunch Lines

This abandoned building, in the upscale West End neighborhood here in Washington, DC, is surrounded by the trappings of gentrification; shiny new buildings with trendy restaurants, hip stores, and luxury apartments. Soon enough, this building will fall to the wrecking ball, and a generic gentrification building, with a pretty facade and empty soul, will take its place. Decrepit as it may be, it still has plenty of beautiful visual character, and that’s why I chose to sketch it little-by-little during my lunch breaks over the span of seven days. The last day’s sketching was done huddled under an umbrella as the rains fell, the sense of urgency apparent as I wasn’t sure when this building would soon fall as well.

LL_38_web

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7 thoughts on “Lunch Lines”

  1. Wow,that takesreal dedication Jason. Especially in the temperatures you are experiencing at the moment. We have the same issue here with old buildings. Character is being lost and bright and shiny taking their places. I do my fair share of the sketching of the soon to be lost but find it so sad sometimes that I am turning to the more ethereal to keep that spirit alive even if the physical area is changing beyond all recognition. Keep them coming, love these works 😉

  2. Jason,
    Another fine drawing from your Lunch Line series. They keep getting better. I appreciated your comments about how buildings like these are summarily discarded in the rush to “clean up” the neighborhood. It’s sad that you’re documenting what we will lose.

    1. Thanks; the sketches are a lot of fun to do, as they break up what is an otherwise very digital and very precise work day. And DC itself is a city in transition right now; whole neighborhoods are getting this treatment, and the pros and cons of gentrification aside, watching the visuals of the city’s neighborhoods changing is quite interesting.

    1. Thanks; this is actually only half of the building. I didn’t get the front door amongst other features, but I figured that what is there is enough to tell the story of the building.

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