Summer Blogging Mini-Break

Tomorrow’s post will be my last for the next three weeks. The 100th edition of the Tour de France begins this Saturday, and as a hardcore dedicated live-breathe-eat-sleep pro cycling fan, my life will revolve solely around this race from the start in Corsica through to the twilight finale in Paris. If you’ve never seen the Tour de France before, then this year’s historic edition will truly be the one to watch.

See you all in three weeks, and as always, thanks for following this blog!

Merci et Au Revoir; Vive le Tour!

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Metro Sketch

When sketching on a busy commuter train, sometimes you just have to grab at bits and pieces of a person. This was one such case, but I played it smart and used the opportunity to grab a few important poses, such as a hand cupping a forehead and another hand curled up in front of a mouth, both poses conveying a deeper sense of thought and focus.

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Vatican Drawing

Here’s a drawing I’ve been wanting to do for a while, but with a family, work, household, laundry, laundry, and more laundry, my life sometimes moves at the speed of a tar pit. Recently, though, I freed up some time to catch up on art projects, including this drawing.

A few months ago, I watched along with the rest of the world at the sight of the Vatican rooftop, waiting for the billowing black smoke to turn white and announce the selection of a new Pope. While not a Catholic, I found this fascinating because in the social media age of instant status updates, waiting around for black smoke (no new Pope) to turn white (new Pope) was a nice throwback to time-honored rituals that transcend technology, and because it was so unique, it also made for memorable visuals that I just had to draw (note: since I’m not Catholic nor Catholic-knowledgable, I’m not sure what the sensitivity levels are on this, so if this is in any way offensive to Catholics, please let me know.)

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Lunch Lines

Washington, DC is an interesting city, where residential neighborhoods mix in with commercial and retail neighborhoods. Built largely in a monochromatic and monumental style, the relative blandness of the commercial and retail areas are livened up by the colorful row homes abounding throughout the city, such as this one I quickly sketched during a midday stroll around the Foggy Bottom neighborhood.

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Late-night with a Pigma Micron 01 Pen

Here’s a picture of a drawing I’m working on, and pen I’m doing it with. It’s a Pigma Micron 01, and I’m using it because not only it’s permanent ink, but because my yet-another Pigma Micron 05 has dried-out on me (which was yet-another Pigma Micron 05 pen to become detached from it’s cap accidentally for an extended period of time).

Oh well, it’s late, quiet, and peaceful, so I’m gonna scrawl away at this exercise in hand-lettering and illustration with my teeny tiny little black point.

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Metro Sketch

As a citizen of Washington, DC, I love tourists. Sure they clog up the escalators, walk around aimlessly looking for the sites (“Excuse me sir, do you know where the White House, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, Capital Building, and the Starbucks are?”), and buy those awful tye-dyed sequined Washington, DC touristy souvenir shirts, but they do come bearing good money for the local economy. However, they do tend to hamper sketch artists on the train, as one did here, forcing me to strain my neck around too much touristy body mass to grab a few lines of regular Washingtonians dredging home after another body and soul-crushing day of working in Washington, DC.

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